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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending August 16, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
August 16, 2013
  1. New Form of Carbon Is Stronger Than Graphene and Diamond
    Chemists have calculated that chains of double or triple-bonded carbon atoms, known as carbyne, should be stronger and stiffer than any known material.
  2. Devices Connect with Borrowed TV Signals, and Need No Power Source
    Devices that can make wireless connections even without an onboard battery could spread computing power into everything you own.
  3. Cyborg Parts
    Princeton researchers, using a 3-D printer, have built a bionic ear with integrated electronics.
  4. Denser, Faster Memory Challenges Both DRAM and Flash
    A new memory technology can store a terabyte on a chip the size of a postage stamp.
  5. More Connected Homes, More Problems
    They might offer convenience or potential cost savings, but Internet-connected home appliances may also create security risks.
  6. Experts Raise Doubts Over Elon Musk’s Hyperloop Dream
    While technically feasible, Musk’s hyperloop will likely be expensive.
  7. “Spoofers” Use Fake GPS Signals to Knock a Yacht Off Course
    Civilian GPS is vulnerable to being spoofed—and researchers are looking for ways to ensure the signals are legit.
  8. <

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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