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The Billionaire Prince Who Says Saudi Arabia Is in Far Bigger Trouble than the Other Royals Admit
In contrast to Saudi Arabia’s official position, some influential Saudis are worrying about America’s oil boom and attempts to reduce oil consumption.
—Kevin Bullis, energy editor

Fukushima Cleanup Turns Toxic for Japan’s Tepco
A detailed rundown of the toxically complicated Fukushima Daiichi cleanup effort.
—Mike Orcutt, research editor

In the Name of the King
The remarkable story of the effort to collect and sequence Tutankhamen’s DNA.
—Will Knight, online editor

O.K., Glass
The best thing I read this week.
—Rachel Metz, IT editor

Pressure Cookers, Backpacks and Quinoa, Oh My
A first-person account shows how closely the authorities are watching our Google searches.
—J. Juniper Friedman, Web producer

Smarter Cars Open New Doors to Smarter Thieves
Please don’t hack my car!
—David Sweeney, marketing communications manager

Did Goldman Sachs Overstep in Criminally Charging Its Ex-Programmer?
Michael Lewis investigates the case of a computer programmer prosecuted by Goldman Sachs.
—Will Knight, online editor

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images created by Google Imagen
images created by Google Imagen

The dark secret behind those cute AI-generated animal images

Google Brain has revealed its own image-making AI, called Imagen. But don't expect to see anything that isn't wholesome.

biomass with Charm mobile unit in background
biomass with Charm mobile unit in background

Inside Charm Industrial’s big bet on corn stalks for carbon removal

The startup used plant matter and bio-oil to sequester thousands of tons of carbon. The question now is how reliable, scalable, and economical this approach will prove.

AGI is just chatter for now concept
AGI is just chatter for now concept

The hype around DeepMind’s new AI model misses what’s actually cool about it

Some worry that the chatter about these tools is doing the whole field a disservice.

Peter Reinhardt
Peter Reinhardt

How Charm Industrial hopes to use crops to cut steel emissions

The startup believes its bio-oil, once converted into syngas, could help clean up the dirtiest industrial sector.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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