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High-Tech, High-Risk Forensics
The idea here seems pretty important: how the DNA of an innocent person can end up on a murder victim’s body.

Tattoo Sensor Warns “Extreme” Athletes of Exhaustion
A clever electric tattoo could tell extreme athletes when enough’s enough.
—Susan Young, biomedicine editor

Selfie-Loathing
This piece in Slate digs into what actually makes social media pernicious.
—Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

Slow Ideas
Atul Gawande explores the importance of social communications in spreading important innovations, as illustrated by an effort to bring safer birthing practices to poor parts of India.
—Will Knight, online editor

First Federal Study Finds Natural Gas Fracking Chemicals Didn’t Spread
A well-reported recap of progress in a study by the U.S. Department of Energy to gauge the risk that fracking poses to underground drinking water supplies.
—Mike Orcutt, research editor

How the Higgs Boson Was Found
Physicist Brian Greene pens a nice explanation of the history of the Higgs Boson and why its discovery is so important for science.
—Aviva Rutkin, editorial intern

Twitter Expands TV-Ad tool for Marketers Targeting Live Viewers
I thought this was interesting, especially as it relates to EmTech2013 speaker Deb Roy of Twitter.
—David Sweeney, marketing communications manager

Aireal from Disney Research
Imagine playing a soccer video game and you are playing the goalie. The other team shoots the ball and you feel it hit you in real life. And you are not wearing any special devices. Aireal can now make that happen.
—Brent Turner, chief digital officer

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transplant surgery
transplant surgery

The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research
Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research

Saudi Arabia plans to spend $1 billion a year discovering treatments to slow aging

The oil kingdom fears that its population is aging at an accelerated rate and hopes to test drugs to reverse the problem. First up might be the diabetes drug metformin.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

images created by Google Imagen
images created by Google Imagen

The dark secret behind those cute AI-generated animal images

Google Brain has revealed its own image-making AI, called Imagen. But don't expect to see anything that isn't wholesome.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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