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Stories from Around the Web (Week Ending June 28, 2013)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

The Revolution Will Be Solarized
The name says it all: the Sunbelt of the United States ought to be ideal for solar power. Slowly the South is getting on board.
—Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

WikiLeaks Volunteer Was a Paid Informant for the FBI
Wired has a mysterious story about a young Icelandic man who became confidant of Julian Assange’s—and then became an informant for the FBI.
—Mike Orcutt, research editor

The Power of People
A nice dose of technological optimism related to the environment. If only we had better property rights, would we do better at taking care of the planet?
—Kevin Bullis, senior energy editor

Fab.com’s Ascent to $1 Billion Valuation Brings Misstep
Interesting, insider-y look at mistakes online retailer Fab.com has made during its fast ascent.
—Rachel Metz, IT editor

Google: From “Don’t Be Evil” to Evil Empire?
An interesting take from the perspective of a native San Franciscan on the burgeoning Google backlash.
—Kyanna Sutton, senior Web producer

Life After Google Reader
The race to launch Google Reader replacements and new link-sharing networks like Potluck and my favorite, Quibb.
—Brent Turner, chief digital officer

The Psychology of Workout Music
So this is why I can’t run five miles unless I’m listening to Kraftwerk.
—Will Knight, online editor

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