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Stories From Around the Web (Week Ending June 14, 2013)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

The Secret War
This account of General Keith Alexander’s cyberwar efforts paints a valuable big picture.
—Tom Simonite, IT editor

Are Coders Worth It?
Web developers are in such demand that it’s hard to find one. What’s it like to be one?
—Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

Atomic Bomb Tests Confirm Formation of New Brain Cells
Proof, thanks to fallout from atomic bomb tests, that the hippocampus—the memory and navigation center of the brain—can grow new neurons throughout life.
—Susan Young, biomedicine editor

Here’s Everything We Know about PRISM To Date
A valuable roundup of the NSA spying controversy.
—Laura Wilson, director of events programming

World’s First Commercial Cyborg Scuttles onto Kickstarter
To build your own remote-controlled cyborg, just contribute to this Kickstarter project and catch a creepy crawly to torture.
—Susan Young, biomedicine editor

Skeuomorphism’s Death Has Been Greatly Exaggerated
An insightful take on the controversy over Apple’s new mobile OS.
—Will Knight, online editor

Clip-Air Project Envisages Modular Aircraft You Can Board at a Railway Station
Kinda weird, but fun.
—Brent Turner, chief digital officer

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Europe's AI Act concept

A quick guide to the most important AI law you’ve never heard of

The European Union is planning new legislation aimed at curbing the worst harms associated with artificial intelligence.

Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

supermassive black hole at center of Milky Way
supermassive black hole at center of Milky Way

This is the first image of the black hole at the center of our galaxy

The stunning image was made possible by linking eight existing radio observatories across the globe.

transplant surgery
transplant surgery

The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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