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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending June 7, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Former FCC Chairman: Let’s Test an Emergency Ad Hoc Network in Boston
    Outgoing FCC chairman, Harvard scholar make a pitch for private networks to aid public safety.
  2. Wearable Computing Pioneer Says Google Glass Offers “Killer Existence”
    Thad Starner thinks people will soon crave the ultrafast communication that Google Glass makes possible.
  3. Plastic from Grass
    Engineers seek a cheaper biodegradable polymer.
  4. Even with Cord-Cutting and the Web, the TV Audience is Massive
    Although we have more ways to entertain ourselves than ever, it’s proving hard to unseat television as the most popular mass medium.
  5. Samsung Says New Superfast “5G” Works with Handsets in Motion
    Samsung has made some bold claims about its “5G” technology, but experts await published confirmation.
  6. The Dictatorship of Data
    Robert McNamara epitomizes the hyper-rational executive led astray by numbers.
  7. Cheap Batteries for Backup Renewable Energy
    A battery made of cheap materials could store power when it’s windy for use when it’s not.
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