Skip to Content

Stories from Around the Web (Week Ending May 31, 2013)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Anatomy of a Hack: How Crackers Ransack Passwords
This is exceptionally geeky but smartly done, because it shows in a memorable way how passwords get cracked. 
—Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

Google’s Nutirition Knowledge Graph
Google is introducing nutrition information in search results, similar to what it’s doing with weather, sports scores, and flight information.
—Emily Dunkle, user interface/digital designer

GeoGuessr
Get ready to get addicted to this cartography-based game by Google, which Slate reviewed recently.
—Jane Allen, project manager

Mental Disorder or Neurodiversity?
A timely and thought-provoking essay on our perception of conditions such as autism, ADHD, and depression.
—Will Knight, online editor

BuzzFeed Writer Resigns In Disgrace After Plagiarizing ‘10 Llamas Who Wish They Were Models’
The Onion’s daft but surprisingly spot-on indictment of the state of online journalism.
—Will Knight, online editor

Climatologist Myles Allen Says We’re ‘Doomed’ If We Keep Burning Carbon, Then Embraces Dubious Silver Bullet
The always-excellent Joe Romm on why we shouldn’t hold our breath on carbon capture and storage.
—David Rotman, editor

Avatars Ease Voices for Schizophrenia Patients
A promising U.K. study describes how the use of an avatar can help treat patients with schizophrenia who hear voices.
—Kyanna Sutton, senior Web producer

3-D Print Your Own Famous Sculptures from the Met
An interesting home use for 3-D printing.
—David Sweeney, marketing communications manager

Sony Lab Offers a Peek into the Future
Researchers from Sony’s lab are coming up with fun mashups: Legos controlled by Playstation controllers! Personal drone helicopters!
—Brent Turner, chief digital officer

3-D Printed Windpipe Gives Infant Breath of Life
Heralding a future of body parts printed on-demand.
—Susan Young, biomedicine editor

Keep Reading

Most Popular

A Roomba recorded a woman on the toilet. How did screenshots end up on Facebook?

Robot vacuum companies say your images are safe, but a sprawling global supply chain for data from our devices creates risk.

A startup says it’s begun releasing particles into the atmosphere, in an effort to tweak the climate

Make Sunsets is already attempting to earn revenue for geoengineering, a move likely to provoke widespread criticism.

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2023

Every year, we pick the 10 technologies that matter the most right now. We look for advances that will have a big impact on our lives and break down why they matter.

These exclusive satellite images show that Saudi Arabia’s sci-fi megacity is well underway

Weirdly, any recent work on The Line doesn’t show up on Google Maps. But we got the images anyway.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.