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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending May 24, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Bitcoin Hits the Big Time, to the Regret of Some Early Boosters
    The first major conference for the digital currency suggests it is gaining legitimacy, but in a manner disappointing to some early enthusiasts.
  2. Google and NASA Launch Quantum Computing AI Lab
    The Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab will use the most advanced commercially available quantum computer, the D-Wave Two.
  3. Home Tweet Home: A House with Its Own Voice on Twitter
    A techie’s San Francisco home has its own Twitter feed. Will yours be next?
  4. One-Time Pad Reinvented to Make Electronic Copying Impossible
    The ability to copy electronic code makes one-time pads vulnerable to hackers. Now engineers have found a way round this to create a system of cryptography that is invulnerable to electronic attack.
  5. What 5G Will Be: Crazy-Fast Wireless Tested in New York City
    Samsung’s technology for ultrafast data speeds currently requires a truckload of equipment.
  6. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned
    Scientists produced embryonic stem cells from the DNA of one person combined with a human donor egg.
  7. In a Data Deluge, Companies Seek to Fill a New Role
    A job invented in Silicon Valley is going mainstream as more industries try to gain an edge from big data.
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