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Seven Must-Read Stories from the Past Week (May 11-17)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Treading Carefully, Google Encourages Developers to Hack Glass
    Breaking its own restrictions, Google will show developers how to build any kind of app for Google Glass at its I/O conference.
  2. New Kind of LED Could Mean Better Google-Glass-Like Displays
    Micro-display LED tech could light up the next generation of face-wearable gadgets.
  3. It’s Time to Talk about the Burgeoning Robot Middle Class
    A prominent roboticist asks: How will a mass influx of robots affect human employment?
  4. How to Mine Cell-Phone Data Without Invading Your Privacy
    Researchers use phone records to build a mobility model of the Los Angeles and New York City regions with new privacy guarantees.
  5. What It’s Like to See Again with an Artificial Retina
    Artificial retinas give the blind only the barest sense of what’s visible, but researchers are working hard to improve that.
  6. Can Carbon Capture Clean Up Canada’s Oil Sands?
    Alberta will serve as a test bed for large-scale carbon capture and sequestration.
  7. The Algorithm That Automatically Detects Polyps in Images from Camera Pills
    Analyzing the footage from camera pills is a time-consuming task for medical professionals. Now computer scientists are attempting to automate the process.
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Deep Dive

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Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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