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Profiles in generosity

Eberhard and Shahla Wunderlich

Princeton, New Jersey
February 20, 2013

Eberhard Wunderlich earned a master’s from MIT in 1975 and a PhD in 1978, both in electrical engineering and computer science. He worked at AT&T for 32 years and retired as vice president of systems engineering and development. Shahla Wunderlich earned a master’s from the American University of Beirut and a PhD from MIT in 1978 in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism. She is a professor at Montclair State University. They both enjoy traveling the world. “It has brought us an awareness that we need to solve global issues together,” Eberhard says.

Eberhard and Shahla Wunderlich

Eberhard: “We established two gift annuities at MIT because it’s a great financial decision for people entering retirement. It allows us to increase our giving to the Institute and to receive a steady retirement income stream; we get an immediate tax benefit and diversify our investments as well. One gift will support the MIT Public Service Center, to develop a class of leaders with global vision, and the other will support endowed fellowships, because we need leaders with strong technical and scientific skills.”

Shahla: “A gift annuity is a wonderful way to give because you are investing in society and the future, and you can see results now. We owe our educations, careers, and all we have professionally to MIT. I remember walking through the halls as a student so proud just to be there. We feel that our MIT knowledge and experience cannot be matched. We want to give so new generations will benefit too.”

Please consider establishing your own gift annuity.
Gift annuities can provide a high tax-free fixed income.

For giving information, contact Judy Sager: 617-253-6463; jsager@mit.edu
Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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