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Introduce Us to Some Fascinating Young People

Nominations are open for our annual list of 35 innovators under 35. Don’t hold back.
January 9, 2013

Our readers often tell us that they are inspired and intrigued by our annual report on 35 important innovators under the age of 35. What you might not know, however, is that anyone can nominate a candidate. And there’s no rule against nominating yourself. So if you know of someone who is doing brilliant work in one of the fields we cover (the Web, energy, computing, communications, materials, or biomedicine), tell us. We’re looking for people from all over the world.

One important tip: simple as it may sound, we are looking for people who have a good story to tell. They have done at least one identifiable thing that is—or soon will be—very important. Their work and the problems they hope to solve must be able to be clearly described. We do not pick people simply because they are generally thought of as innovative or clever. The number of papers they have written or patents they have filed is not necessarily important to us.

So check out last year’s list and some earlier editions, and then tell us: do you know of anyone who belongs in such a group?

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