Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Watch the World’s Most Promising Young Technologists Pitch their Big Ideas

From EmTech 2012: young innovators present world-changing ideas in three minutes or less.
November 28, 2012

A few weeks ago, at MIT Technology Review’s annual EmTech conference, 24 of our 35 innovators under 35 award winners presented on stage, in three minutes or less, their big ideas for advancing technology across a spectrum of disciplines. If you missed the event, now you can catch all of these presentations on video.

Don’t miss Ren Ng, 32, our 2012 Entrepreneur of the Year, creator of the Lytro camera, talk about the genesis of his radical breakthrough in photography.

Other highlights from the series:

Saikat Guha, 30, explains how he found a way to protect privacy while delivering customized ads to mobile phones. This presentation may win him an Oscar for best use of a bagel in a metaphor.

Leila Takayama, 31, a research scientist at Willow Garage, talks about what it’s like to live and work with robots every day. Maybe you will be as surprised as I to learn that it’s not all Rosie, like on The Jetsons.

Chris Soghoian, 30, principal technologist at the ACLU, talks about why he’s keeping tabs on the Feds who are surveilling private citizens.

These are just a small sample of the range of ideas that were presented at EmTech 2012. All of these “elevator pitches” are now posted on the participating innovators’ profile pages.

Know someone under 35 who should be on the 2013 list of the world’s most promising young innovators? Nominations are now open.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.