Skip to Content

Yahoo Japan to Sell Genetic Test

The Internet company will market a test for disease-associated DNA variants.

Starting next month, Yahoo Japan will begin selling a disease-focused genetic testing kit directly to consumers. For 29,800 yen, around $370, customers can order the GeneLife2012 test kit, which will search for genetic variants associated with the risk of developing diseases such as diabetes, stroke, and heart disease, according to a press release.

http://health.yahoo.co.jp/gene/

Customers will ship off some spit for analysis, which will be handled by another Tokyo-based company, Genesis Health Care. The company will look for disease-assocated changes in 68 genes. 

According to the Japan Times, Yahoo Japan will play only a marketing role and will not handle any data from the medical tests. But, if I am interpreting Google Translation’s interpretation of the press release correctly, it seems the Tokyo-based Internet giant is looking to expand its role as a source for health-care information and potentially its presence in the growing trend for individuals to monitor their own health. The company says the GeneLife2012 test will help prevent or slow diseases by alerting customers to the need for lifestyle changes through diet, exercise, and stress management.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other
conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other

Forget dating apps: Here’s how the net’s newest matchmakers help you find love

Fed up with apps, people looking for romance are finding inspiration on Twitter, TikTok—and even email newsletters.

computation concept
computation concept

How AI is reinventing what computers are

Three key ways artificial intelligence is changing what it means to compute.

still from Embodied Intelligence video
still from Embodied Intelligence video

These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems

They show how intelligence and body plans are closely linked—and could unlock AI for robots.

We reviewed three at-home covid tests. The results were mixed.

Over-the-counter coronavirus tests are finally available in the US. Some are more accurate and easier to use than others.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.