Skip to Content
MIT News magazine

Linda and Arthur Gelb

Belmont, Massachusetts

Art Gelb earned an ScD in systems engineering at MIT in 1961 and has been an entrepreneur for nearly 50 years. He cofounded The Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC), an applied information technology firm, and later founded Four Sigma, which uses computer modeling to trade in the financial markets. He and his wife, Linda, have 10 grandchildren. “You look at these kids and you see tomorrow,” he says.

“At 15 I lost one parent and at 16 I lost the other, both to cancer,” says Art Gelb. “I had no brothers, sisters, or money. Eight years ago I lost a son to cancer when he was 42. Twelve years ago, I had cancer myself and was treated at Dana-Farber. I’m fine now, but getting ill made me push for MIT and Dana-Farber—two world-class gems—to join forces in the fight against cancer. I have the privilege of being on the governing bodies of both institutions, and it drove me crazy that they weren’t working together formally to develop cures for cancer, a scourge of humanity. MIT, unmatched in engineering and science, performs distinguished research on cancer, especially now with the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. And Dana-Farber is perhaps the finest cutting-edge clinical and cancer research institution in the world. I began talking with the leadership at both to formally do joint planning and projects—to put together teams that no organization can match—to gain insights and develop cures for this impenetrable disease. It took 10 years to evolve, but now our gift has launched the Bridge Project, a collaboration between biotechnologists at MIT and clinical researchers throughout the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. The more research we can do in parallel, the sooner there will be a breakthrough that simply couldn’t have been envisioned without this project.”

Gifts to MIT support future generations.

For information, contact Rob Scott: 617-253-3394; rscott@mit.edu. Or visit giving.mit.edu.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting

With plans to create realistic synthetic embryos, grown in jars, Renewal Bio is on a journey to the horizon of science and ethics.

VR is as good as psychedelics at helping people reach transcendence

On key metrics, a VR experience elicited a response indistinguishable from subjects who took medium doses of LSD or magic mushrooms.

This nanoparticle could be the key to a universal covid vaccine

Ending the covid pandemic might well require a vaccine that protects against any new strains. Researchers may have found a strategy that will work.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.