Skip to Content

Genomics Goes to (Clinical) Trial

Foundation Medicine will profile tumor genomes for Novartis’ cancer drug trials.

A partnership between pharmaceutical giant Novartis and genomics company Foundation Medicine could bring more cancer therapeutics to the clinic at an accelerated pace. 

Novartis plans to use Foundation Medicine’s genome interpretation technology as part of its clinical trial enrollment process for cancer drug testing over the next three years. This type of tumor genome analysis, which involves searching for potential drug targets in the genetic sequence of tumors, is already an important part of Novartis’ clinical trials, reports GenomeWeb.

One of the promises of genomic sequencing and personalized medicine is that drug treatments can be tailored to the genetic anomalies of a patient’s tumor, which may be quite different from those of another patient’s tumor. Novartis could use the genomic profiles of patients’ tumors to better select participants for their clinical trials or perhaps to identify new molecular targets for treatment.   

“The comprehensive molecular assessment of Novartis’ Oncology clinical trial samples is expected to help to bring potentially lifesaving therapies to the right patients more quickly, and we expect that the wealth of molecular information will help fundamentally improve the way cancer is understood and treated,” said president and CEO of Foundation Medicine Michael Pellini in a statement.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

open sourcing language models concept
open sourcing language models concept

Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it’s giving it away for free

Facebook’s parent company is inviting researchers to pore over and pick apart the flaws in its version of GPT-3

transplant surgery
transplant surgery

The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research
Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research

Saudi Arabia plans to spend $1 billion a year discovering treatments to slow aging

The oil kingdom fears that its population is aging at an accelerated rate and hopes to test drugs to reverse the problem. First up might be the diabetes drug metformin.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.