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We Spot Google’s Goggles on the Streets of San Francisco

Co-founder Sergey Brin takes Project Glass for a test walk.

I spotted Google co-founder Sergey Brin on Wednesday, wearing the search leader’s forthcoming augmented reality goggles in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood.

Credit: Rachel Metz.

In April, Google confirmed it was working on glasses that can do things like show maps, messages and other information by releasing a mocked up video of a person using the glasses to take photos, receive messages, share videos of what they’re seeing, and obtain directions. 

Like Google’s press images for what it calls “Project Glass,” the glasses Brin wore while walking down King Street were lens-free with a small, clear prism-like display mounted above the right eye. It wasn’t clear if the glasses were completely self-contained, or if they were wired to what appeared to be a smart phone in his left hand. Brin, who has been seen sporting the headgear before, wasn’t using them at the moment, though–he said they were out of power.

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