Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Let’s Talk About Privacy (but Not in Russian or Hindi)

Facebook and Twitter are available in other languages. But only 15 percent of their privacy policies have been fully translated.
April 4, 2012

The world is increasingly talking about privacy these days. But when people try to read the actual privacy policies of major social networking sites, they often must do so in English.

Facebook’s translation posture is particularly poor, as explained in a new paper by Carnegie Mellon University researchers, accepted at an upcoming privacy conference in France:

“Facebook includes 67 contemporary languages other than English, yet much of the site’s privacy-critical text is only partially, or not at all, translated … Facebook’s Privacy Policy is fully translated for only 10 languages, and partially translated for 26 languages. For 31 languages, including some of the world’s most widely spoken, such as Hindi and Russian, none of the privacy policy is translated.”

Twitter is also spotty: 

“In the Japanese Twitter, as in nine other languages, a paragraph about cookies is in English. The rest of the page is in the target language.”  

By contrast, LinkedIn’s policies are fully translated in all 15 of the languages the site uses. Google+ fares well, and Flicker falls in the middle.

A nice chart in the paper spells out the details. In the wake of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission’s recommendations for protecting consumer privacy, they are very much worth reading for a better sense of whether major companies are walking the current talk.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.