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Giants Beat Pats 59 to 41 (in Social Media Super Bowl Buzz)

New England gets more website hits, but the Giants get more social buzz.
February 1, 2012

Social media analysis reveals that Giants fans show more online gusto than do their Patriots counterparts.

The Patriots’ official website. Credit: Technology Review

The analysis comes from the analytics firms Nielsen and NM Incite, and shows that Giants fans look at almost twice as many pages on the team website than do their Patriots counterparts. What’s more, Giants fans are far more prolific bloggers. 

As 781vicci recently put it on Twitter: “I hope the #GIANTS WIN THE SUPERBOWL IM COUNTIN ON THEM BOT CUZ IM FROM NY OR IM A FAM JUS SO I CAM WEAR THAT @BRIDGEBOISE #CRUNECK ON TV.”

Thanks to such missives, the Giants have been garnering about 59 percent of the buzz on Twitter, Facebook, and other online platforms. The Pats have only been getting 41 percent. (True, in terms of quarterbacks, fans talk about Tom Brady more than Eli Manning, and more people visit the Pats site—644,000 unique visitors during the playoffs compared to 574,000 for the Giants.)  

Social media analytics is a fast-evolving field that promises to revolutionize advertising, politics, and more. Someone, somewhere, is working on way to translate all of this into a point-spread prediction.

The info-graphic below summarizes the results of the Nielsen study:

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