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Anita Klaiman

Somerset, New Jersey
December 20, 2011

“M y husband entered MIT at 16 and commuted from Dorchester every day on the subway. His parents worked in the garment industry in Boston. What they most wanted was for their son to get a great education. The Institute opened his mind. He couldn’t get enough of life—engineering, opera, ballet, theater, art, travel. Yosemite, Bryce Canyon, Zion … we visited them all. I used to call him ‘Mr. Vista .’ He was always taking in the view. On family vacations, David passed the time teaching our three kids the MIT song. Now, the eight grandchildren know it, too: Hurrah for Technology, ‘ology ‘ology oh / Glorious old Technology, ‘ology ‘ology oh! After David died, I found all his MIT books in the attic. That’s when I thought about establishing a scholarship in his name. I wanted to do something for him that would last—a gift that would be ongoing because we are not. A scholarship lives on. It’s a way of continuing life. David would love it that his scholarship is cheering on an MIT student.”

The late David Klaiman earned a bachelor’s degree in management in 1949. An industrial engineer, he worked for John Deere, General Motors, and other large corporations before founding a company that provided computerized financial support to small businesses. In retirement he worked with SCORE, a national organization that helps people start small businesses. After he died in 2007, Anita established the scholarship in his memory.

Gifts to MIT support future generations.

For information, contact Rob Scott: 617-253-3394; rscott@mit.edu. 
Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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