Skip to Content
Uncategorized

3G Smart Phones Are an Effective Form of Population Control, Says Indian Telco

In a TV spot remarkable for its light treatment of the issue, India’s !DEA cell carrier suggests more entertainment will be the solution to the pressure of the country’s burgeoning population.
September 12, 2011

They say bed is the poor man’s opera – but what happens when all of us have access to all the opera – er, entertainment – we want? A new advertisement for India’s !DEA cell carrier posits that couples who have 3G-connected smartphones with access to unlimited amounts of entertainment will stop having babies.

India’s IDEA cell carrier has found a whole new way to market mobile entertainment

The ad suggests “that there will be ‘No Aabaadi, No Barbaadi’ because people will be ‘3G pe Busy,’” but you don’t have to speak the language to understand its message:

The idea is simple – whenever there’s a blackout, people rediscover amorous pursuits. But if they have smartphones in hand, they’ve at least got an alternative to TV. Unfortunately, that’s not the case in real life. Studies of the effects of blackouts on birth rates find that people are not more likely to conceive when the power is out.

It’s nothing short of remarkable that India is a country that can joke about both its population problem and birth control, but all kidding aside, there is one level on which this message could be true. Empowering women is the shortest route to bending the curve of future population growth, and wireless access to the internet could be one way to make education more accessible in the developing world.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.