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A Bracelet Body Monitor

The new tracker, from Bluetooth device-maker Jawbone, will likely provide a competitor to Fitbit.
July 14, 2011

Jawbone, maker of popular Bluetooth headsets, has caught the self-tracking bug. The company announced a new device, a sleek bracelet called UP, at the TED Global conference on Wednesday. The device’s functionality is similar to the thumb-sized fitbit; embedded sensors measure the wearer’s movement, which is then used to calculate information on activity and sleep. A smart phone app displays this information, along with manually entered nutritional information. But then it takes a step further, suggesting challenges and recommendations for the user;

Credit: Jawbone

According to a blog from Co.design;

…the smartphone program provides “nudges” meant to help you live healthier, day by day. For example, if you haven’t slept much, when you wake up the app might suggest a high-protein breakfast and an extra glass of water.

…[It] represents an entirely new space for the company with more potential than any it’s tackled before, including Bluetooth headsets and speakers. “The interest grew when people realized how much work we’ve done in body computing and how large this market is,” explains [Travis Bogard, Jawbone’s VP of product management.]

The company hasn’t yet named a price for its new “functional jewelry” but says it will be available by the end of the year.

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