Skip to Content
MIT News magazine

Giving Back

Bose donates stock to MIT

Bose Corporation founder Amar Bose ‘51, SM ‘52, ScD ‘56, has given MIT the majority of the stock in the company, which is known for its audio equipment.

The donation, announced in April, is in the form of nonvoting shares. MIT will receive cash dividends on its shares in years when the company pays dividends; that income will be used to sustain and advance MIT’s education and research mission. 

Under the terms of the gift, MIT cannot sell its Bose shares and will not participate in the management or governance of the company. The corporation will remain private and independent, operating with no change in strategy or leadership. Bose, 81, will remain chairman and technical director of the company, whose value is undisclosed. 

After earning three MIT degrees in electrical engineering, Bose was asked to join the faculty in 1956, accepting with the intention of teaching for no more than two years. But he remained until 2001, making important contributions to the Institute’s teaching of undergraduate electrical engineering. 

When Bose was a grad student, he bought a stereo and was disappointed by its sound quality. That started his quest for a way to reproduce sound more realistically. He founded Bose Corporation in 1964 and soon developed stereo speakers and loudspeaker systems that did just that. Privately owned, the company focuses on long-term research. “Dr. Bose has always been more concerned about the next two decades than about the next two quarters,” President Susan ­Hockfield said when MIT announced the gift.

Bose “set the highest teaching standards, for which he is still admired and loved by his faculty colleagues and the many students he taught,” ­Hockfield said. “His insatiable curiosity propelled remarkable research, both at MIT and within the company he founded.”

Keep Reading

Most Popular

This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting

With plans to create realistic synthetic embryos, grown in jars, Renewal Bio is on a journey to the horizon of science and ethics.

VR is as good as psychedelics at helping people reach transcendence

On key metrics, a VR experience elicited a response indistinguishable from subjects who took medium doses of LSD or magic mushrooms.

This nanoparticle could be the key to a universal covid vaccine

Ending the covid pandemic might well require a vaccine that protects against any new strains. Researchers may have found a strategy that will work.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.