Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Beyond Escher: The Art Of Tesselation Revealed

A new approach to tesselations allows any artist to create Escher-like images

One of the heroes of 20th century graphic art was Maurits Cornelis Escher, who used concepts from mathematics to produce extraordinary images.

One device that Escher mastered was the tesselation, which he exploited to create fantastic, periodic arrangements of images.

Today, San Le, an artist and computer programmer based in the US, shows how to generalise Escher’s technique. And his approach is so simple that anyone can give it try. “The rules to creating tiling art are straightforward,” says Le.

The idea is to study the shapes that fit together to tile a plane and to clearly label the sides that end up being adjacent. It’s then a question of creating an image that connects across these complementary sides.

The beauty of this approach is that it changes the problem from a mathematical challenge to an artistic one.

To demonstrate the power of his method, Le goes a step further than Escher by applying it to Penrose’s aperiodic tiling of a plane using darts and kites (shown above). That’s a tiling Escher never had the chance to work with but one that he would surely approve of. See below for Le’s version.

Le even goes on to show how to create fractal tilings, surely in a manner that Escher would approve of.

The results are mesmerising (see the paper for more examples). Why not give it try?

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1106.2750: The Art of Space Filling in Penrose Tilings and Fractals

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.