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Slice of MIT Features Churchill Address, Necktie Rebellion

The MIT Alumni Association’s blog about MIT culture and alumni lives, Slice of MIT, has a new feature—Remember When—that identifies posts about historic moments. Just go to the website (alum.mit.edu/pages/sliceofmit/) and click on the Remember When category to see posts like these:

1948 Mayor to MIT: Use Flamethrowers to Melt Snow?“—Boston mayor James Curley wrote to the MIT president asking for help with that winter’s heavy snowfall. Could Curley use chemicals or flamethrowers to get rid of the drifts? See President Karl Compton’s response.

When Bose Walked Out“—Professor Patrick Henry Winston ‘65, SM ‘67, PhD ‘70, described his student experience when his professor, the legendary Amar Bose ‘51, SM ‘52, ScD ‘56, demanded—and got—respect.

Baker House Necktie Rebellion of 1949“—When undergraduates moved into Baker House in 1949, students were required to wear jackets and ties to the dining room. The students found a clever way to protest.

Other stories include “Short Snorter: Prof. Dietz’s WWII Ritual,” “MIT’s Costa Rican President,” “An MIT Family Journey in Paintings,” “1916 Telephone Banquet: MIT’s Early Teleconference,” “Tuskegee Honors MIT’s First Black Alum,” and “Churchill Headlined MIT’s Mid-Century Fete.”

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