Skip to Content

Energy Agency Partnering with the Military

The Secretary of the Navy says better batteries and electric grids will help protect soldiers.
March 2, 2011

The Secretary of the Navy, Raymond Mabus, said at an Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) conference today that the agency and the military will partner on two energy projects. One is to develop better energy storage systems for soldiers in the field and for powering electrical systems on ships. The DOD and ARPA-E have requested $25 million for each for 2012. The military will also work with an existing grid storage program at ARPA-E to improve electric grids at bases.

The funding could be a boon for the Agency, which has not received regular funding since it was authorized in 2007 (it’s been running on Recovery Act funds). At the conference this week, Mabus and others made a strong case that energy research should be funded as a way of helping to maintain national security. Mabus said that dependence on oil makes soldiers “too susceptible to supply and price shocks,” and that protecting supply lines for transporting fuel results in large numbers of casualties. He has set a goal that the Navy and Marines will use non-fossil fuels for half of their energy by 2020.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

It’s time to retire the term “user”

The proliferation of AI means we need a new word.

The problem with plug-in hybrids? Their drivers.

Plug-in hybrids are often sold as a transition to EVs, but new data from Europe shows we’re still underestimating the emissions they produce.

Sam Altman says helpful agents are poised to become AI’s killer function

Open AI’s CEO says we won’t need new hardware or lots more training data to get there.

A brief, weird history of brainwashing

L. Ron Hubbard, Operation Midnight Climax, and stochastic terrorism—the race for mind control changed America forever.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.