Skip to Content
MIT News magazine

Mystery Hunt Kickoff

February 22, 2011

A crowd of puzzlers, including Federico Gomez, gathered in Lobby 7 on January 14 for the launch of the 2011 Mystery Hunt. Featuring a Mario Brothers theme, this year’s hunt began with an invitation to the wedding of Mario and Princess Peach. When the princess was kidnapped in the middle of the ceremony, teams retreated to work around the clock on puzzles that would help Mario find his bride. Less than 42 hours later, the team Codex Alimentarius helped Mario invade the Aperture Science Testing Facility to rescue Peach—and find the Mystery Hunt coin. Team Codex also won the right to design next year’s Mystery Hunt. The contest has taken place annually during Independent Activities Period since Brad Schaefer ‘78, PhD ‘83, started the tradition in 1980. The 2011 Mystery Hunt puzzles and solutions are posted at ihavetofindpeach.com/puzzles.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

DeepMind’s cofounder: Generative AI is just a phase. What’s next is interactive AI.

“This is a profound moment in the history of technology,” says Mustafa Suleyman.

What to know about this autumn’s covid vaccines

New variants will pose a challenge, but early signs suggest the shots will still boost antibody responses.

Human-plus-AI solutions mitigate security threats

With the right human oversight, emerging technologies like artificial intelligence can help keep business and customer data secure

Next slide, please: A brief history of the corporate presentation

From million-dollar slide shows to Steve Jobs’s introduction of the iPhone, a bit of show business never hurt plain old business.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.