Skip to Content
MIT News magazine

MIT’s Newest Geniuses

Three alumni win MacArthur grants
October 27, 2010

Three MIT alumni are among the 23 winners of the 2010 MacArthur fellowships, also known as “genius grants.” Awarded annually out of the blue, the $500,000 grants are to be used as the recipients see fit. MIT physics professor Nergis Mavalvala, PhD ‘97 (right), was recognized for her efforts to detect gravitational waves created by the violent collisions of stars and in the earliest moments of the universe. Linguist Jessie Little Doe Baird, SM ‘00, won for her efforts to revitalize Wampanoag (or Wôpanâak), the Algonquian language of her ancestors, which became extinct in the 19th century. Emmanuel Saez, PhD ‘99, an economics professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and director of its Center for Equitable Growth, was honored for his work on the relationship between income and tax policy. His research focuses on wealth and income inequality, capital income taxation, and retirement.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

wet market selling fish
wet market selling fish

This scientist now believes covid started in Wuhan’s wet market. Here’s why.

How a veteran virologist found fresh evidence to back up the theory that covid jumped from animals to humans in a notorious Chinese market—rather than emerged from a lab leak.

light and shadow on floor
light and shadow on floor

How Facebook and Google fund global misinformation

The tech giants are paying millions of dollars to the operators of clickbait pages, bankrolling the deterioration of information ecosystems around the world.

masked travellers at Heathrow airport
masked travellers at Heathrow airport

We still don’t know enough about the omicron variant to panic

The variant has caused alarm and immediate border shutdowns—but we still don't know how it will respond to vaccines.

This new startup has built a record-breaking 256-qubit quantum computer

QuEra Computing, launched by physicists at Harvard and MIT, is trying a different quantum approach to tackle impossibly hard computational tasks.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.