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Tech Reunions Bring Song and Festivities

August 25, 2010

Beloved traditions and some surprising musical entertainment greeted more than 3,200 alumni and guests at Tech Reunions, June 3-6. Participants, who hailed from 44 U.S. states and other jurisdictions plus 29 countries, could choose from 139 events, including class dinners, a Pops concert, and faculty lectures. The 113th Tech Night at the Pops featured a performance of Mendelssohn’s Piano Concerto No. 1 by Sarah ­Rumbley ‘12 and a Beatles sing-along organized around the video game Rock Band. The 40th-reunion class invented its own MIT serenade to the tune of “Let It Be.”

Technology Day, featuring talks by MIT thinkers and a luncheon to celebrate class giving, was marked by good cheer and great fund-­raising reports–classes gave more than $36 million by reunion weekend. Honorary Alumni Association memberships were awarded to President Hockfield and Sara Bittenbender, cochair of the Class of 1940 reunion committee. The oldest alumnus in attendance was 93-year-old Gerry McCaul ‘40. In the annual Reunion Row, the Class of ‘85 took top honors.

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