Skip to Content
Uncategorized

GM Rides a Rickshaw to China

The strange, but surprisingly fun, two-wheeled electric pod could be successful there.
August 19, 2010

Last year when GM first introduced a prototype two-person vehicle called Puma, which is based on the two-wheeled Segway platform, I was intensely skeptical. It was designed for cities, supposedly, but it looked like it would get squashed like a grape by massive taxis on the streets of Manhattan. After I took a test spin, I was partly won over–it was responsive, fun to drive and, since it could turn in place, easily maneuverable. But it still seemed like a doomed idea.

Now that GM’s taken an updated version to China, however, I think I get it. This week it’s been showing off an updated version of the vehicle, called the EN-V, at the World Expo in Shanghai, a city where the vehicle makes perfect sense. Drivers there are already used to dodging scads of bicycles and scooters and wandering pedestrians. Commuters there show no fear of squashing–outside of subway stations they jump on the back of motorcycle “taxis,” which tear off recklessly through crowds, the passenger wearing no helmet. As people can afford it, they’re switching from bikes to cars to get out of the rain and smog, and that’s making traffic jams ever worse. The EN-V would be a perfect alternative, one that would ease congestion and smog alike.

And the new versions of the vehicle being demonstrated there look a lot more solid, spacious, and stylish than the first prototypes. I can imagine people wanting to buy them and be seen in them.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.