Skip to Content

Climate Bill Whimpers, Collapses

Senator Harry Reid opts for a bill without carbon dioxide limits or renewable electricity standards.
July 23, 2010

Last year, comprehensive climate and energy legislation was well on its way to becoming law. After a version passed the House, pundits were concerned mostly with whether it would be passed in time for the Copenhagen climate talks last December. But Senators balked, and a drive this summer to put some sort of bill together has stalled.

Yesterday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev) threw up his hands, giving up on a comprehensive bill for now in favor of a narrow energy bill without any limit on greenhouse gas emissions or regulations to require renewable energy. What’s left are measures to hold BP accountable for the oil spill, to invest in natural gas trucks (the pet project of oil and natural gas tycoon T. Boone Pickens), to improve home energy efficiency, and to restore money to the Land and Water Conservation fund.

Reid says he’ll still work on a comprehensive bill, but it looks like it’s out of play for the year.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Here’s how a Twitter engineer says it will break in the coming weeks

One insider says the company’s current staffing isn’t able to sustain the platform.

Technology that lets us “speak” to our dead relatives has arrived. Are we ready?

Digital clones of the people we love could forever change how we grieve.

How to befriend a crow

I watched a bunch of crows on TikTok and now I'm trying to connect with some local birds.

Starlink signals can be reverse-engineered to work like GPS—whether SpaceX likes it or not

Elon said no thanks to using his mega-constellation for navigation. Researchers went ahead anyway.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.