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Nintendo Plans Glasses-Free 3D Console

“3DS” handheld system will be one of the first 3-D devices to work without special glasses.

Yesterday, Nintendo announced that a new version of its hand held console will display 3-D games without requiring users to wear special glasses.

Many TV manufacturers are coming out with 3-D TVs (and 3-D glasses) this year, and desktop gaming is likely to be a major focus for 3-D consumer products. Nintendo is trying to get ahead of the pack by offering glasses-free technology, but how realistic it will look, especially in different lighting, remains to be seen. There have been glasses-free 3-D demos in the past, but these tend to be far less vivid than glasses-enabled 3-D.

The console will be available within the year and will first be demoed at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in June, according to the company, which did not provide details on how the technology will work.

Sony has said that 3-D games will be available for its PS3 before long, although these will likely require active-shutter 3-D glasses.

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