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Toy Drone

February 23, 2010

Instead of using a traditional remote, this flying toy can be controlled by any iPod Touch or iPhone running special software. A camera communicates with the controller over a Wi-Fi connection, delivering a pilot’s-eye view to the user’s screen. Graphics representing enemy planes can be overlaid on this view with augmented-reality technology, and the AR Drone can dogfight with them. Thanks to all the onboard processor power available, it can take advantage of technology that keeps it much more stable in flight than similar toys. As a second camera scans the ground below, the Drone automatically adjusts its engines to keep it flying level or hovering.

Courtesy of Parrot

Product: AR Drone

Cost: Not yet determined

Availability: 2010

Source: ardrone.parrot.com

Company: Parrot

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