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Making 3-D Pop

December 17, 2009

3-D computer gaming has been underwhelming to date, largely because awkward add-on hardware is typically required to support 3-D glasses, and because frame rates are relatively low. (A 3-D system needs to generate twice as many images per second as a standard screen to perform equivalently in gaming applications.) The G51J solves these problems by using built-in graphics hardware that operates LCD shutter glasses at 120 hertz. That’s 60 frames per second for each eye, fast enough for all but the most hard-core gamers. Most modern titles do not have to be redesigned to be played in 3-D.

Courtesy of Asus

Product: G51J 3D laptop

Cost: $1,700

Availability: Now

Source: www.asus.com

Companies: Asus, Nvidia

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