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Friends Gather at Tech Reunions

August 18, 2009

More than 3,100 alumni and guests gathered on campus June 4-7 for Tech Reunions 2009 to see old friends and take part in events such as Technology Day, which featured faculty lectures on the human mind and artificial intelligence. At the Tech Day Luncheon, Alumni Association president Toni Schuman ‘58 announced that reunion giving had surpassed $152 million. Tech Night at the Pops featured award-winning pianist Jennifer Lai ‘11 performing “Rhapsody in Blue” and Bob Muh ‘59 narrating Aaron Copland’s “Lincoln Portrait.” The newly formed MIT Military Alumni/ae Association celebrated the commissioning of this year’s ROTC graduates in a ceremony led by General David Petraeus, commander of the U.S. Central Command, whose son, Stephen ‘09, was among the new officers. In the annual competitions, the Class of 1989 took home the 13th annual Reunion Row cup and tied with the Class of 1984 for victory in the Tech Challenge Games.

The Pops concert ends with the traditional “Stars and Stripes Forever” and a cascade of balloons.

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