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Glaucoma Detector

A new device uses computer vision to help doctors more quickly and accurately test patients for glaucoma. In some current tests for vision loss, patients report when they see a light at the periphery of vision, but this subjective method is error-prone and can make diagnosis tricky. The TrueField Analyzer measures the tiny contractions of a patient’s pupils as they respond to a light pattern emitted by the device. By recording the pupils’ movements, it can determine areas of reduced vision sensitivity. The device, which can test both eyes at the same time, is expected to reach the market by the end of this year.

Courtesy of Seeing Machines

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