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Tech Day 2009: See Into the Mind’s Eye

Join fellow alumni June 6 at this year’s Technology Day to learn about faculty research on visual cognition, the perception of self and other, and emerging trends in artificial intelligence.

This intellectual cornerstone of the reunion weekend, June 4-7, is open to all alumni, as are events such as Tech Night at the Pops–but you’ll need to register. Sophomore Jennifer Lai, an award-winning pianist, will perform at Tech Night at the Pops, the first student to solo in many years.

Is this your year? Alumni who graduated in years ending in 9 or 4 can register online for a full agenda of class events, and all alumni can sign up for traditional events through May 13: alum.mit.edu/reunions.

Giant Leaps: Celebrate the Apollo Program

MIT is celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Apollo space program’s first lunar landing with a three-day symposium titled Giant Leaps.

Apollo engineers, astronauts, and managers will share insights with today’s leaders in energy, environment, air transportation, space exploration, and education.

The June 10-12 events also include a Boston Pops concert narrated by astronaut Buzz Aldrin, ScD ‘64, lectures, exhibits, films, and zero-gravity flights.

All alumni are invited to participate by watching a live webcast. Learn more online: apollo40.mit.edu.

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