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Nano-Structured Bone Graft

October 20, 2008

Bone grafts can more closely mimic the chemical structure and composition of natural bone, thanks to a new material. Like other synthetics, the material minimizes the risk of immune rejection, but it’s much better at encouraging cells to grow. Developed by Michigan company Pioneer Surgical Tech­nology, the material is made up of two bonelike components not found in other synthetics: calcium-containing nanocrystals the same size as those in natural bone, and collagen to mimic the soft tissues around natural bone.

Product: FortrOss
Cost: $700 to $4,000 per treatment, depending on size of graft
Source: www.pioneersurgical.com
Companies: Pioneer Surgical Technology

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