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Artery Drill

August 19, 2008

Around 10 million Americans have peripheral-artery disease–plaque buildups in the arteries of their arms and legs that can cause chronic pain and even lead to amputation. Surgeons treat the condition by inflating balloons inside the artery or by inserting metal-mesh tubes known as stents, but a new drill-tipped catheter could be a better option. The drill has blades that expand and contract to fit the artery, plus a vacuum that sucks up the debris.

Product: PV Atherectomy System
Cost: Competitive with similar devices, which cost about $3,000
Source: pathwaymedical.com
Companies: Pathway

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