Skip to Content

Fact-Checking Bush on Research Spending

The president’s comments on basic research aren’t quite true.
January 29, 2008

In last night’s State of the Union address, President Bush blamed Congress for failing to fund his American Competitiveness Initiative–a failure that led to hundreds of researchers losing their jobs. But he was only telling part of the story.

In the address, President Bush said, “Last year, Congress passed legislation supporting the American Competitiveness Initiative, but never followed through with the funding.” He then asked Congress to “double federal support for critical basic research in the physical sciences.”

The request for doubled funding is a repeat from 2006, when Bush announced the American Competitiveness Initiative, which would, over 10 years, double the funding at key agencies involved in physical-sciences research. The initiative was in response to a National Academies report highlighting the need to increase basic research funding if America is to remain competitive worldwide.

So far, those funds have failed to appear. The 2007 budget request included the funds, but the appropriations bill stalled. (See “Alternative-Energy Spending Fizzles Out.”) The 2008 budget request also included the funds, but again, the spending was never approved by Congress.

But the president’s statement that Congress “never followed through with the funding” leaves out the fact that Congress failed to do so in part because of pressure from him. The funding increases for basic research had actually been included in a catchall spending bill, but they were cut at the last minute in response to veto threats from the president, who had set a firm limit on the amount of domestic spending he would allow. The added research money put the bill over the limit, and the Democrats weren’t willing to cut money from other areas, such as the funding for energy research that Bush had wanted to be cut. What’s more, nearly a billion dollars in earmarks–Congressional pet projects–also directed money away from basic research.

As a result, hundreds of researchers from two national research labs who had been expecting increases in funding suddenly found themselves without jobs. The cuts have also put in jeopardy two international research projects, including one for a large experimental fusion reactor that could address long-term energy needs. (See “Federal Research Funding Cut.”)

Keep Reading

Most Popular

open sourcing language models concept
open sourcing language models concept

Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it’s giving it away for free

Facebook’s parent company is inviting researchers to pore over and pick apart the flaws in its version of GPT-3

transplant surgery
transplant surgery

The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research
Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research

Saudi Arabia plans to spend $1 billion a year discovering treatments to slow aging

The oil kingdom fears that its population is aging at an accelerated rate and hopes to test drugs to reverse the problem. First up might be the diabetes drug metformin.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.