Skip to Content
Uncategorized

New Oceans of Data

A transoceanic building boom is fueling Internet growth.
January 1, 2008

If you want reliable global Internet connections, have a limitless appetite for video, or happen to live in Greenland or East Africa, here’s some good news: a construction surge in transoceanic cable is under way. The new cables will connect the world more closely than ever, add far more bandwidth, and provide enough redundancy for data signals to survive accidents and outages. For now, the trans­oceanic information system has enough ­capacity, but that could soon change, and the system has some physical vulnerabilities. In January, an anchor tore two cables linking Europe and Egypt, causing massive outages. Inadequate cable service forces some areas in developing countries to rely on expensive satellite connections. And the long-term upswing in global video consumption and file sharing is sucking up bandwidth.

It’s a big change from several years ago, when telecom companies were going belly-up from overbuilding their networks. “Essentially, the global telecom bust has become a boom,” says Eric Schoonover, senior analyst at TeleGeography Research, which provided the data for the maps and charts in this graphic. At least $6.4 billion worth of transoceanic cable projects are in the works, with even more on the drawing boards.

Interactive by Alastair Halliday, Charts by Tommy McCall, Data & Telegraphy Research (www.telegraphy.com)

Keep Reading

Most Popular

AV2.0 autonomous vehicles adapt to unknown road conditions concept
AV2.0 autonomous vehicles adapt to unknown road conditions concept

The big new idea for making self-driving cars that can go anywhere

The mainstream approach to driverless cars is slow and difficult. These startups think going all-in on AI will get there faster.

biomass with Charm mobile unit in background
biomass with Charm mobile unit in background

Inside Charm Industrial’s big bet on corn stalks for carbon removal

The startup used plant matter and bio-oil to sequester thousands of tons of carbon. The question now is how reliable, scalable, and economical this approach will prove.

images created by Google Imagen
images created by Google Imagen

The dark secret behind those cute AI-generated animal images

Google Brain has revealed its own image-making AI, called Imagen. But don't expect to see anything that isn't wholesome.

AGI is just chatter for now concept
AGI is just chatter for now concept

The hype around DeepMind’s new AI model misses what’s actually cool about it

Some worry that the chatter about these tools is doing the whole field a disservice.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.