Skip to Content

Cutting Greenhouse Gases with Plug-Ins

We knew they would save gas; now we know they’re cleaner, too.
July 19, 2007

Adding extra batteries to hybrids, and a plug to charge them, is a good way to save gas, replacing it with electricity from the grid. Indeed, drivers could commute to work and back using almost no gasoline. Such “plug-in” hybrids have garnered support from those who hope to reduce consumption of foreign oil.

But it hasn’t been completely clear that replacing gasoline with electricity produced largely from fossil fuels would help reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. And some have feared that using more electricity would drive up levels of sulfates, ozone, particulates, and other pollutants in the air.

A study released today by the environmental group National Resources Defense Council and the Electric Power Research Institute helps clear up these issues, showing that

plug-ins, once they’re on the market, will significantly cut greenhouse gases. They’ll also decrease other pollutants, on average, across the United States.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

A Roomba recorded a woman on the toilet. How did screenshots end up on Facebook?

Robot vacuum companies say your images are safe, but a sprawling global supply chain for data from our devices creates risk.

A startup says it’s begun releasing particles into the atmosphere, in an effort to tweak the climate

Make Sunsets is already attempting to earn revenue for geoengineering, a move likely to provoke widespread criticism.

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2023

Every year, we pick the 10 technologies that matter the most right now. We look for advances that will have a big impact on our lives and break down why they matter.

These exclusive satellite images show that Saudi Arabia’s sci-fi megacity is well underway

Weirdly, any recent work on The Line doesn’t show up on Google Maps. But we got the images anyway.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.