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CBS Builds New Show for TV and PC

For those under 30, online and wireless connectivity has replaced the television. CBS wants to tap into that trend.
September 15, 2006

CBS wants to use the Internet and wireless mediums to build loyalty to its television programming this fall.

In-and-of itself, I didn’t just bring you earth-shattering news. What’s unique, though, is that CBS is building one of its shows around three mediums–not just one. Jericho, a new program hitting the airways this year, is being written as a television program, an Internet show, and a wireless show, according to CBS’s Digital Media Vice President of Wireless, Cyriac Roeding, who spoke at an industry event earlier this week.

And, if events pan out as he believes they will, Roeding said he thinks most shows will follow this formula in the future.

From the Reuters article:

Roeding christened his multi-media plan the “Holy Grail” for mobile show business, and he implored Hollywood to create a more interactive experience for consumers. The strategy entails creating cross-media platforms, tying together content on cellular phones, the Internet, television and movies, where viewers can interact.

“Interlinks between the cell phone and the Internet create a new ecosystem,” Roeding said. “The result, if you do it right, and this is why I call it the Holy Grail, will be a larger and more loyal audience connected to the show.”

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