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2006 Young Innovators Under 35

The editors of Technology Review have once again selected the TR35, 35 outstanding young innovators under the age of 35. Their work–spanning medicine, computing, nanotechnology, and a lot more–is changing our world.

Since 1999, the editors of Technology Review have honored the young innovators whose inventions and research we find most exciting; today that collection is the TR35, a list of technologists and scientists, all under the age of 35.

2006 Innovator of the Year: Joshua Schachter
2006 Humanitarian of the Year: Christina Galitsky

 
Song JinMaking nanowires get in line Sumeet SinghFaster defenses against computer viruses Ling LiaoLighting up computers
Paris SmaragdisTeaching machines to listen Liam PaninskiDecoding brain signals
Benjamin ZhaoPerfecting peer-to-peer networks
Michael WongCleaning up with nanoparticles Joshua SchachterHow tags exploit the self-interest of individuals to organize the Web for everyone. Anand RaghunathanMaking mobile secure
Nikos ParagiosClearer computer vision Michael RaabMaking fuel ethanol more cheaply Paul RademacherThe man who opened up the map
Roger DingledineWhen e-mail absolutely, positively has to get there anonymously Jeffrey BodePeptide “Legos” to make new drugs Utkan DemirciDisposable AIDS diagnosis
William KingThe worlds smallest soldering iron Jason FriedKeeping online collaboration simple Jane McGonigalDesigning games with new realities
Edward BoydenArtificially firing neurons Apostolos ArgyrisDisguising data as noise Jay ShendureThe $1,000 genome
Alice TingLighting cellular movies Ashok MaliakalThe floppy screen Christopher VoigtA vision in bacteria
Prithwish BasuNetworking Unplugged Eddie KohlerA better operating system Seth Coe-SullivanMaking screens crystal clear
Ram K. KrishnamurthyCooler computers Manolis KellisUnderstanding genomes Joshua NapoliHigher-resolution 3-D displays
Christina GalitskySimple technologies save energy and lives Stefan DumaBetter virtual crash dummies Stephanie LacourStretchable electronic skin
Marin SoljacicModeling the flows of light Matthew HerrenBeaming textbooks across Africa

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