Skip to Content

Rocky Start for CO2 Trading

The European Union handed out more allowances than it should have.

In 2002, the European Union ratified the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on climate change, which requires that global greenhouse-gas emissions be reduced by 2012 to an amount 5 percent below 1990 levels. To do its part, the EU is relying largely on market mechanisms. Companies that operate certain carbon-emitting facilities, such as coal- or oil-fired electrical generating stations, are granted “allowances” – the legal right to release a certain amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each year – and may buy and sell these allowances as they wish.

Such a market, in theory, gives companies an incentive to reduce emissions, so that they can avoid buying extra allowances and sell their surplus ones. But the European Union Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme, which opened in January 2005, has already run into some unexpected glitches. In April and May, data leaked by some member states and the European Commission showed that in the first year of the market’s operation, most EU countries handed out more allowances than were needed. Total allowances exceeded the actual amount of carbon emitted by at least 67 million tons, or 3.4 percent, according to PointCarbon, a research firm based in Oslo, Norway. The news disoriented carbon traders and caused allowance prices, which had risen steadily since the market’s opening, to plummet from about 30 euros per ton of carbon dioxide to a low of less than 10 euros per ton.

Low allowance prices mean companies have little incentive to reduce their emissions. Governments have been so generous when allocating permits that this first, experimental phase of allowance trading – which lasts through 2007 – is unlikely to lead to real emissions reductions, says Christian Azar, a professor of physical-resource theory at Chalmers University in Gothenburg, Sweden. What’s needed, says Azar, is a cap on allowances.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Here’s how a Twitter engineer says it will break in the coming weeks

One insider says the company’s current staffing isn’t able to sustain the platform.

Technology that lets us “speak” to our dead relatives has arrived. Are we ready?

Digital clones of the people we love could forever change how we grieve.

How to befriend a crow

I watched a bunch of crows on TikTok and now I'm trying to connect with some local birds.

Starlink signals can be reverse-engineered to work like GPS—whether SpaceX likes it or not

Elon said no thanks to using his mega-constellation for navigation. Researchers went ahead anyway.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.