Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Nano danger, danger!

Worries over nanotoxicity are not going away.

The same day our magazine feature article “Tiny Toxins” appeared this week, Friends of the Earth released a report detailing the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics and sunscreens. The recommendation of the environmental group:

“a moratorium on further commercial release of personal care products that contain engineered nanomaterials, and the withdrawal of such products currently on the market until adequate, publicly available, independent peer-reviewed safety studies have been completed. Friends of the Earth further recommends that adequate regulations be put in place to protect the general public, workers manufacturing these products, and the environment.”

As our feature explains, FoE just might have a point. Just like any other new type of materials used in consumer products, nanoparticles in cosmetics should be adequately tested. And they haven’t been, despite calls for years from a number of those in the nanotech research community.

The problem, of course, is that the ultra-fine particles used in cosmetics and sunscreens are not really nanotechnology, despite what the product marketing might say. From a technology perspective they have little to do with the nanoelectronics, nano biosensors, and nano-based solar cells that are the real promise of nanotech. But by latching onto “nano” as a way to market new formulations of cosmetics and sunscreens, manufacturers have presented these ultra-fine particles as the face of nanotech. Now the rest of the nanotech community needs to worry about the repercussions.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.