Skip to Content
Uncategorized

One Touch, One Word, One World of Warcraft

The Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories (MERL) use voice recognition and touch screen to power World of Warcraft.
April 13, 2006

I love video games. This isn’t a secret. My writing partner and I wrote a book about them (“Dungeons and Dreamers: The Rise of Computer Game Culture from Geek to Chic”). But I don’t love them in the traditional “lock myself in a room to solve Call of Duty 2” kind of way. I love them because they oftentimes serve as the bridge between wicked-cool technologies and mainstream commercial applications.

So when I stumbled upon this blog – complete with the YouTube video – I was flabbergasted. The video, done by folks at MERL, gives a demonstration of how a video game might combine voice recognition software (which is used in some games already) and touch screens (also used in some games), thereby creating a virtual world experience that would physically involve players who would interact with a created game space – without any interrupter such as a controller.

A snippet from a synopsis of the research paper:

With the advent of large multi-touch surfaces, developers are now applying this knowledge to create appropriate technical innovations in digital table design. Yet they are limited by the difficulty of building a truly useful collaborative application from the ground up. In this paper, we circumvent this difficulty by: (a) building a multimodal speech and gesture engine around the Diamond Touch multi-user surface, and (b) wrapping existing, widely-used off-the-shelf single-user interactive spatial applications with a multimodal interface created from this engine.

**UPDATE April 26, 2006:

My headline is misleadiing. Thanks to David Joerg for pointing this out: The game shown is not World of Warcraft, it’s Warcraft 3, a different game from Blizzard. Warcraft 3 is a real-time strategy game, where a single game will take 10 - 40 minutes. World of Warcraft is the famous massively multiplayer online role-playing game, where 4 hours a day is barely enough.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Every year, we look for promising technologies poised to have a real impact on the world. Here are the advances that we think matter most right now.

Scientists are finding signals of long covid in blood. They could lead to new treatments.

Faults in a certain part of the immune system might be at the root of some long covid cases, new research suggests.

AI for everything: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Generative AI tools like ChatGPT reached mass adoption in record time, and reset the course of an entire industry.

What’s next for AI in 2024

Our writers look at the four hot trends to watch out for this year

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.