Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Digital Publishing

A few months before I took my position at Technology Review, I started work on a digital publishing company. It’s strictly DIY, which means it’s self-funded for now. Everyone working on the project is doing so out of the kindness…
June 29, 2005

A few months before I took my position at Technology Review, I started work on a digital publishing company. It’s strictly DIY, which means it’s self-funded for now. Everyone working on the project is doing so out of the kindness of their hearts – and my writers are toiling away on their books.

The methodology behind the company: all digital, all the time. We’re going to deliver books targeted at specific groups (i.e., the kinds of books I find interesting), and we’re going to offer them in a variety of ways: .txt, .doc, .pdf, e-books, and hardback/softback. It’s not difficult to do – and it’s not pricey either. I can put out a book for under $5,000, and have it available (and book quality format) in a multitude of places.

It’s unclear to me why there isn’t more of this going on (although truth be told, I’m not an insider in the book publishing industry – so maybe it is and they just haven’t called me).

But the concept of digital publishing continues to take up most of my spare time in the evenings.

Our own David Talbot even addressed digital publishing (through the lens of the U.S. national archives) in last month’s Technology Review.

And today, this BBC article caught my attention.

500,000 visitors use the British Library’s reading rooms every year The vast majority of UK research material will be available in electronic form by 2020. According to a study commissioned by the British Library, 90 percent of newly published work will be available digitally by this time.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Workers disinfect the street outside Shijiazhuang Railway Station
Workers disinfect the street outside Shijiazhuang Railway Station

Why China is still obsessed with disinfecting everything

Most public health bodies dealing with covid have long since moved on from the idea of surface transmission. China’s didn’t—and that helps it control the narrative about the disease’s origins and danger.

individual aging affects covid outcomes concept
individual aging affects covid outcomes concept

Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid

Drugs that rejuvenate our immune systems and make us biologically younger could help protect us from the disease’s worst effects.

Europe's AI Act concept
Europe's AI Act concept

A quick guide to the most important AI law you’ve never heard of

The European Union is planning new legislation aimed at curbing the worst harms associated with artificial intelligence.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.