Skip to Content
Uncategorized

The Tide Goes Out Before the Tidal Wave Comes In

Note to self: if you never see the water going out — way out — on the beach, it’s time to run like hell.CNN has a really fascinating survivor’s tale of what it’s like to be caught in a tsunami…

Note to self: if you never see the water going out — way out — on the beach, it’s time to run like hell.

CNN has a really fascinating survivor’s tale of what it’s like to be caught in a tsunami when the tidal wave comes ashore. Something that it is almost certainly better to read than to experience.

This 9.0 natural disaster is one catrosphy that we cannot blame on global warming, of course. But we can blame the death toll, according to another CNN story, on the failure of the affected countries to sign up for the US tsunami warning system.


“They had no tidal gauges and they had no warning,” said Waverly Person, a geophysicist at the U.S. National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado, which monitors seismic activity worldwide. “There are no buoys in the Indian Ocean and that’s where this tsunami occurred.”



“Unfortunately, we have no equipment here that can warn about tsunamis,” said Budi Waluyo, an official with Indonesia’s Meteorology and Geophysics Agency. “The instruments are very expensive and we don’t have money to buy them.”

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Here’s how a Twitter engineer says it will break in the coming weeks

One insider says the company’s current staffing isn’t able to sustain the platform.

Technology that lets us “speak” to our dead relatives has arrived. Are we ready?

Digital clones of the people we love could forever change how we grieve.

How to befriend a crow

I watched a bunch of crows on TikTok and now I'm trying to connect with some local birds.

Starlink signals can be reverse-engineered to work like GPS—whether SpaceX likes it or not

Elon said no thanks to using his mega-constellation for navigation. Researchers went ahead anyway.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.