Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Early Success for Malaria Vaccine

A malaria vaccine tested in more than 2,000 Mozambique children cut the risk of developing the disease by 30 percent and lowered the incidence of life-threatening episodes by 58 percent, according to Healthday.com. One NIH official is quoted as saying…
October 15, 2004

A malaria vaccine tested in more than 2,000 Mozambique children cut the risk of developing the disease by 30 percent and lowered the incidence of life-threatening episodes by 58 percent, according to Healthday.com. One NIH official is quoted as saying this is “a major advance.”

These are the first early results (published today in The Lancet; registration required) from the largest pediatric malaria vaccine trial done in Africa and are the first to show some benefit of a malaria vaccine for kids. This is hope for a field that hasn’t had much success in developing a vaccine for a disease that kills 3000 children each day. (My colleague Erika Jonietz wrote about new malaria vaccines, including this one, a few months back.)

It won’t be until the end of the decade at the earliest that we might see a malaria vaccine approved. Let’s just hope that GlaxoSmithKline, the drug company that co-developed this vaccine and has said it’s committed to making this vaccine a reality, will actually follow through on its promise, considering how unlucrative the vaccine business is. It’s doubtful the company will be able to supply the vaccine affordably to everyone who needs it without help from richer nations.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

It’s time to retire the term “user”

The proliferation of AI means we need a new word.

The problem with plug-in hybrids? Their drivers.

Plug-in hybrids are often sold as a transition to EVs, but new data from Europe shows we’re still underestimating the emissions they produce.

Sam Altman says helpful agents are poised to become AI’s killer function

Open AI’s CEO says we won’t need new hardware or lots more training data to get there.

A brief, weird history of brainwashing

L. Ron Hubbard, Operation Midnight Climax, and stochastic terrorism—the race for mind control changed America forever.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.