Skip to Content

RFID Relief

Software that should make it easier for small businesses to adopt radio frequency ID technology – without breaking the bank – is being readied for release by Dallas, TX, startup AirGate Technologies. The latest RFID tags can store product details that let companies track items from factory to warehouse to retail shelf; large organizations like Wal-Mart and the U.S. Department of Defense are rapidly implementing the technology and dragging their suppliers along with them. The problem, says AirGate CEO Michael Sheriff, is that many smaller companies that own multiple brands of RFID readers – one at the warehouse doors, another in the product-label printers, and so forth – and use multiple systems for storing product information can’t afford custom software to link them all together. AirGate’s one-size-fits-all software, to be unveiled next spring, acts like a universal translator. It’s the first system that can take data from any RFID reader and present it intelligibly on a simple Web page or dump it into a database program.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

open sourcing language models concept
open sourcing language models concept

Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it’s giving it away for free

Facebook’s parent company is inviting researchers to pore over and pick apart the flaws in its version of GPT-3

transplant surgery
transplant surgery

The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research
Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research

Saudi Arabia plans to spend $1 billion a year discovering treatments to slow aging

The oil kingdom fears that its population is aging at an accelerated rate and hopes to test drugs to reverse the problem. First up might be the diabetes drug metformin.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.